What have you done "naturally" lately?

This is the place for your stories, testimonials, naturist humor (in good taste), family concerns, and other issues, as you help each other understand God's will for you.<P>Only Residents and higher may post here.

Moderators: jochanaan, MatthewNeal, jimmy, natman, Senior Moderator, Moderators

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby dv8 » Wed Aug 09, 2017 3:26 pm

We've had a push-reel mower for years, but never use it. I now think our mistake was in not buying a high-quality tool, as this one needs 3-4 passes to get the grass cut. I'd be more comfortable mowing nude behind one of those than the gas machine - both for the noise factor (gotta watch more carefully when you can't hear!) as well as for the possibility of flying debris.
User avatar
dv8
Permanent Resident
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Fri Feb 19, 2016 1:44 am
Location: Shenandoah Valley, Virginia

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Maverick » Wed Aug 09, 2017 3:31 pm

dv8 wrote:We've had a push-reel mower for years, but never use it. I now think our mistake was in not buying a high-quality tool, as this one needs 3-4 passes to get the grass cut. I'd be more comfortable mowing nude behind one of those than the gas machine - both for the noise factor (gotta watch more carefully when you can't hear!) as well as for the possibility of flying debris.


This is the mower we have, if you're interested: http://www2.fiskars.com/Products/Gardening-and-Yard-Care/Reel-Mowers/StaySharp-Max-Reel-Mower-6205

I find that there are the inevitable shoots of grass that the mower misses, but by and large it cuts incredibly well on a single pass! Our grass is St. Augustine too, which right now is growing tall, thick, and healthy.
User avatar
Maverick
Native Resident
 
Posts: 499
Joined: Tue Aug 25, 2015 11:14 am
Location: DFW, TX

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Bare_Truth » Wed Aug 09, 2017 10:51 pm

Well, as long as everyone else seems to be on yard work issues, I guess I will fit right in.
Early in the week I went out and trimmed out the rogue bamboo that insists in leaning out of the sides of our grove. Then I had to go drag it out of the area adjacent to the grove in order to do further work.

It seems that I had, about 2 weeks earlier, rotary tilled that same area and seeded it to grass. However I had also gathered the rocks into small piles at intervals to assist in removing them. Then other activities intervened and the weeds and grass grew up and covered the piles and I could not mow that area because half or more of the rocks were of a size that I classify as "mower busters". So early this morning I took my Stihl string trimmer out and mowed the weeds and grass and re-exposed the rock piles. As always such trimming is done in full textile mode with eye protection. The textiles being necessary because of my ability to react to pulverized plant spattered on me (especially Toxicodendron radicans :roll: ) Then later today, operating in full naturist mode, I took a couple of 5 gallon plastic buckets on a two wheel hand truck and proceeded to gather the rocks into the buckets with small rocks in one and large rocks in the other. By small rocks I mean ones about the size of medium railroad ballast rock. Tthe small rock is more useful to me for French drains and runoff channels around buildings (a small ditch lined with landscapers cloth and then filled with the small rock)

I gathered about 25 gallons of rock and hauled it to a pile where I accumulate such stuff. By then it was hot enough that I went through about a pint to a quart of iced tea in the process.

Now I should be able to mow the area with reasonable safety for the mower and its blades. By the time I was dealing with the rock it was early afternoon and hot with medium humidity so I was pretty well sweaty when I finished.

-----------------------------------------------
About string trimmers. I have a local small engines shop that happens to be the primary local Stihl dealer. I got my chain saw there and my string trimmer there. I have learned several points that may be of use to others.

Fuel:
(source of info, Stihl help personel via e-mail)
Using 91 octane alcohol free gasoline is the preferred fuel.

2 cycle fuel mix:
Stihl doubles the warranty if you use their 2cycle oil and as it comes in small bottles suitable for mixing up 1 gallon or a largeer 2 gallon size at a time. it is the most convenient.

Storage of the tool
(source of info. The small engines dealer)
Contrary to the manual, DO NOT drain the tank while in storage. Instead use stabilizer in the gasoline, Preferred brand Briggs and Stratton, as well as the 2 cycle oil. At all times, not just when in storage.
Always leave the tank entirely full.
explanation:Really long term storage, e.g. several years, might benefit from draining the tank and running the fuel out, but I have repeatedly stored the string trimmer over the fall-winter months and it starts the next spring on the first or second pull. The first year I drained the tank and ran the fuel out per the manual, and the next spring it was awful to start and did not run well. Under warranty the Stil dealer clued me in and I have not had any trouble since. I always store the chain saw that same way as well and its storage times are of random lengths typically months at a time. The other advantage is that these tools are always ready to go at a few minutes notice.
The chain saw may require 4 pulls, (choke required both tools and priming bulb as well must be used on the string trimmer) A full tank of stabilized gasoline will not allow the carburator to dry and leave gum inside.

Fuel Can.
(source of info, Personal experience)
The 1.25 gallon, No Spill gas can (see at:http://www.nospill.com/)may just be the world's best gas can for such small engines on 2 counts.
1.-- You can use it down to .25 gallons and then refill it with one small bottle of 2 cycle oil, the requisite dose of stabilizer, and a gallon of gas. That way you never run out the can before refilling it so you always have a reserve ready for use.
2.-- That fancy push button valve on cap of the can is the easiest to control and fill the tanks that I have ever seen. You can easily do it with no spills because of the control it gives you. It meets the EPA requirements for spillage control better than anything else I have seen. It is one of the most satisfactory products for doing what they said it would I have ever bought. Though they do not recommend it for fueling cars because of the snout length but their larger cans work well for things like my diesel tractor or lawnmower.
Around here in Missouri these cans are pushing everything else off the market because they just work well and are about the same price.

I hope that fuel can part and the "full tank storage" part helps with the small engine tool problems.
Last edited by Bare_Truth on Wed Aug 09, 2017 10:59 pm, edited 2 times in total.
I never met anyone that I could not learn something from.
User avatar
Bare_Truth
Native Resident
 
Posts: 2233
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:07 pm
Location: Ozark Plateau, Southwest Missouri

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby webmeister » Wed Aug 09, 2017 10:56 pm

Maverick wrote:
webmeister wrote:Lately I have been getting a lot less worried about anyone popping over the fence and seeing me in a naturist state - after all it is a 7 feet high "no see through" double sided cedar fence without step up railing :D


My dad recently purchased a traditional push mower made by Fiskars that is not only quieter than gas or electric but easier to push. Plus, it does a better job of cutting the grass and doesn't trigger my allergies! But the cool thing about it being quiet is that I can mow and still hear around me--essential for a backyard naturist, in my opinion. So there is something to be said about the old-fashioned way of doing things...

Hmmm you got a good point there (but they are expensive :)), while mowing I cannot hear neighbors in their backyard...I do still remain aware of the situation, that's just how I am. I dare say, I feel I am getting to the point of "aww what the heck, it is high time they know" :wink: :lol:
User avatar
webmeister
Native Resident
 
Posts: 269
Joined: Fri Nov 01, 2013 7:03 pm
Location: Northern California

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby naturaldon » Thu Aug 10, 2017 9:00 pm

Bare_Truth wrote:Storage of the tool
(source of info. The small engines dealer)
Contrary to the manual, DO NOT drain the tank while in storage. Instead use stabilizer in the gasoline, Preferred brand Briggs and Stratton, as well as the 2 cycle oil. At all times, not just when in storage.
Always leave the tank entirely full.


I've made it a habit for many years to run my equipment all year long. In the winter, I start everything and let it run for a while, about every two weeks. And I do keep the tanks full. In the spring, I do a full maintenance job (tune up, oil change, sharpen blades, etc.). I'm always ready to go year round. I've never had a major problem. I figure that good, well maintained engines are designed to run, not sit idle.

Oh, and in keeping with the OP, I do the maintenance naked and not ashamed in the garage, except when I sharpen blades on the grinder. :shock:
-Don
He must increase, but I must decrease. (John 3:30)
User avatar
naturaldon
Native Resident
 
Posts: 345
Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2013 12:03 am
Location: NW MO

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Bare_Truth » Fri Aug 11, 2017 12:00 am

naturaldon wrote:.......Oh, and in keeping with the OP, I do the maintenance naked and not ashamed in the garage, except when I sharpen blades on the grinder. :shock:

Brother I fully understand the concern when grinding, however, even then, nothing more than a good denim shop apron and some foot gear should be all that one needs. Denim will deflect sparks and chips that would burn through a thin shirt.
Working_at_a_Lathe_01.JPG
Shoes Socks and a Denim Apron will suffice

However if arc welding there is so much ultra violet light that one can get a "sun burn" for only a brief welding session. and then something like at least a "shop coat may be needed " and the apron may still be needed for the lower legs. Protective clothing need not always be full coverage. There are multiple options.
I never met anyone that I could not learn something from.
User avatar
Bare_Truth
Native Resident
 
Posts: 2233
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:07 pm
Location: Ozark Plateau, Southwest Missouri

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby New_Adventurer » Fri Aug 11, 2017 5:17 am

In arc welding you only need to shield your skin and eyes from the arc and the hot sparks. Everything else is free to breathe, and that lathe operator may want to consider hot chips falling on the feet and getting stuck in the sandal tops. The last time I did any welding was in 1965 in high school.
User avatar
New_Adventurer
Native Resident
 
Posts: 444
Joined: Sat Sep 11, 2010 11:22 pm
Location: Fremont, California

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby webmeister » Fri Aug 11, 2017 11:05 am

webmeister wrote:
Maverick wrote:
webmeister wrote:Lately I have been getting a lot less worried about anyone popping over the fence and seeing me in a naturist state - after all it is a 7 feet high "no see through" double sided cedar fence without step up railing :D


My dad recently purchased a traditional push mower made by Fiskars that is not only quieter than gas or electric but easier to push. Plus, it does a better job of cutting the grass and doesn't trigger my allergies! But the cool thing about it being quiet is that I can mow and still hear around me--essential for a backyard naturist, in my opinion. So there is something to be said about the old-fashioned way of doing things...

Hmmm you got a good point there (but they are expensive :)), while mowing I cannot hear neighbors in their backyard...I do still remain aware of the situation, that's just how I am. I dare say, I feel I am getting to the point of "aww what the heck, it is high time they know" :wink: :lol:

Gas weed whacker just died, so got an electric...a step in a good direction :) No mess, no fuss, very little noise...
User avatar
webmeister
Native Resident
 
Posts: 269
Joined: Fri Nov 01, 2013 7:03 pm
Location: Northern California

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Maverick » Fri Aug 11, 2017 8:45 pm

webmeister wrote:Gas weed whacker just died, so got an electric...a step in a good direction :) No mess, no fuss, very little noise...


:like: :like:

I'm fixing to acquire two electric ones from my boss, who no longer needs them. We'll take the best and sell or donate the other.
User avatar
Maverick
Native Resident
 
Posts: 499
Joined: Tue Aug 25, 2015 11:14 am
Location: DFW, TX

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby naturaldon » Fri Aug 11, 2017 10:59 pm

My "weed-eater" is 4-cycle gas-powered, and has the interchangeable attachment features: light duty weed eater, heavy duty weed eater, brush cutter, hedge trimmer, leaf blower, limb cutter (extended mini chainsaw), and snow thrower (which I don't use naked, but it really does work well on sidewalks).

I love it.

Wife has three electric/battery trimmers, and an electric blower, all of which I use regularly, too. :?
-Don
He must increase, but I must decrease. (John 3:30)
User avatar
naturaldon
Native Resident
 
Posts: 345
Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2013 12:03 am
Location: NW MO

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Bare_Truth » Fri Aug 11, 2017 11:51 pm

Naturaldon wrote:Wife has three electric/battery trimmers, and an electric blower, all of which I use regularly, too. :?


I am considering a hedge trimmer for cleaning up the sides of my bamboo groves (I leave the top of the groves alone as they are 10 to 40 feet in the air). When the stems are still green they are not too hard but a bit "sringy" if the cutter crushed the stem. Dry they harder and still stringy. Where they need trimming the cuts generally need to be made on 3/4" or thinner stems and branches, mostly on the thinner stuff.
I never met anyone that I could not learn something from.
User avatar
Bare_Truth
Native Resident
 
Posts: 2233
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:07 pm
Location: Ozark Plateau, Southwest Missouri

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby naturaldon » Sat Aug 12, 2017 9:51 pm

Bare_Truth wrote:I am considering a hedge trimmer for cleaning up the sides of my bamboo groves (I leave the top of the groves alone as they are 10 to 40 feet in the air). When the stems are still green they are not too hard but a bit "sringy" if the cutter crushed the stem. Dry they harder and still stringy. Where they need trimming the cuts generally need to be made on 3/4" or thinner stems and branches, mostly on the thinner stuff.


I'm totally happy with my hedge trimmer attachment. It zips through shrubs like they were grass. Sounds like a good, well-powered hedge trimmer would make short work of your bamboo.
-Don
He must increase, but I must decrease. (John 3:30)
User avatar
naturaldon
Native Resident
 
Posts: 345
Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2013 12:03 am
Location: NW MO

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby webmeister » Sun Aug 13, 2017 11:20 am

Bare_Truth wrote:I am considering a hedge trimmer for cleaning up the sides of my bamboo groves (I leave the top of the groves alone as they are 10 to 40 feet in the air). When the stems are still green they are not too hard but a bit "sringy" if the cutter crushed the stem. Dry they harder and still stringy. Where they need trimming the cuts generally need to be made on 3/4" or thinner stems and branches, mostly on the thinner stuff.

I once had some Stihl's that had rotating blades...those would go through bamboo like butter...
User avatar
webmeister
Native Resident
 
Posts: 269
Joined: Fri Nov 01, 2013 7:03 pm
Location: Northern California

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Bare_Truth » Sun Aug 13, 2017 11:21 pm

webmeister wrote:I once had some Stihl's that had rotating blades...those would go through bamboo like butter...


I also have a specialty blade for my Stihl string trimmer (requires a straight shaft trimmer as the flexible shaft models simply can't do the job. However it is not sufficient that the blade be able to cut the hedge (of whaterver sort) but it also must produce a neat clean cut as this is not just a clear the brush operation it is a landscaping operation to produce a good looking result. Plus the portion of the bamboo I am trying to cut has almost nil rigidity so the cutting device must be something that holds the item tobe cut and not just wack it off with a fast moving blade. The blade I have is called a weed blade and if used skillfully it can take off a 1.5 inch oak sapling near ground level at a single swipe But it is not of much use against branches on an apple tree that needs pruning or a hedge to be trimmed.
I never met anyone that I could not learn something from.
User avatar
Bare_Truth
Native Resident
 
Posts: 2233
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:07 pm
Location: Ozark Plateau, Southwest Missouri

Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Bare_Truth » Mon Aug 14, 2017 10:24 pm

Now that we have had some cool weather for a week or so, and along with that plenty of dew a medium rain or two and several light rains, the grass increased its growth rate and I had to mow again. I mowed yesterday. As I do not have a grass bagger (nor would likely want one When the grass is too lush and deep to leave the clippings on the lawn I use a reasonably efficient technique.
1-- Select a rectangular area (or any other if you like.
2-- Mow a strip right down the long axis, (about 2 or 3 mower widths is about right
3-- now mow around the perimiter with the discharge open and pointed at the middle until the rectangle is entirely mown.
This should leave clippings well chopped and laying in a strip down the middle.

That was yesterday's task and performed in textile mode so as to not grind up any toxic plant and have it blow back all over me in a breeze.

Then it rained matting down the grass strips which makes it all the more urgent to get the wet grass stips as the rain mats them down thoroughly.
4-- Rake the strip into several piles for pick up so it does not kill the lawn where it is laying. That was this afternoon's task and was done naturally
The results are shown in frame 1 of the following image.
Gather_Load_Dump_Spread.jpg
Click image for better resolution

The pile shown is one of 19 that I got and the can on the hand truck is a 30 gallon size. It is bungeed on to keep it in place. by the time I got through I had filled it 4 times.
5-- the next step it to load the piles into the can on the hand truck and that is shown in frame 2
6-- In frame 3 I have transported the grass to a young bamboo grove that I felt needed a bit more mulching and as you can see one advantage of my transport system is it allows me to take the can off the hand truck, flip it upside down at the destination and liff the can off of a convenient 30 gallon size pile close to the final distribution area.
7-- Then all that is necessary is to use the pitchfork and rake to push and toss the mulch into its final position among the plants.

My mower is a "lawn tractor configuration, and I suppose a bagger might reduce the labor involved but using the mowing pattern that I do in order to minimize the raking phase, I find this method practical for my half acre lawn and the amount of exercise not burdensome. A bagger for that lawn tractor would make maneuvering a real pain and all that would only simplify the gathering and loading phases. If I had 5 grand to spend on a zero turn fancy mower with built in lawn vacuum and bagging system but I can't see blowing that much money on a single dedicated machine. Besides I get some nice mild exercise this way and extra nude time spent on landscaping the yard. Of course that sort of requires being retired to have that much time for such a large yard when one is doing the landscaping one's self.

For those who have not visited my place, the bamboo in the near background in frames 1 and 2 is one of pair of wind breaks I planted on the back end of the tractor shed to reduce the amount of wind that usually blows through the "drive through" tractor shed and they seem to be effective at deterring snow accumulation in the shed. The bamboo grove in frames 3 and 4 that I am mulching is a small one that I planted on the north side of the garden because the trees on the viewer's right are my neighbor's land and it is a maybe that he might not be offended to see me out working in the garden. He does not live on the land and his daughter does not come over to the woods or fence, but if the land were ever sold, things could change so I figured the getting this grove growing now would be a good preventative should things change for the not so better. I suppose my next grove planting effort will be to lengthen this grove substantially. But for now it shields the garden a good bit.
I never met anyone that I could not learn something from.
User avatar
Bare_Truth
Native Resident
 
Posts: 2233
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:07 pm
Location: Ozark Plateau, Southwest Missouri

PreviousNext

Return to General conversation about nudism / naturism

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests