Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Nudism raises lots of questions about body care. It is a healthy way of life in many ways, but it also presents certain concerns that we don't face when clothed. Here you can ask all your questions, and post about the health benefits of nudism / naturism.<P>Only Residents and higher may post here.

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Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby MoNatureMan » Sat Jan 07, 2017 4:59 pm

Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer
I have had 5 skin cancer surgeries in the last 2 months. Thank God all have been ‘Squamous Cell’ and ‘Basal Cell’. Much of this is due to long term damage cause by windshield, sunroof, and drivers side window sun exposure. Add to that, just a lot of time in the sun. Melanoma type skin cancer does not appear to be related to sun exposure and haven't had any of that.
I mentioned to my dermatologist that all my cancer is on my head. None on arms or other parts of body that have also had lots of sun. He admitted, there is a lot they do not know, but then told me of a study that recently came out, that should make a lot of us start thinking.
The study used only smokers (knowing that smoking causes cancer), with the variable being, those that get sun and those that don’t. The results came back and the number of people that had any type of cancer was the same between both groups. Those in the ‘getting sun’ group got the not so bad cancer like I get from sun damage and a lower amount of ‘bad news cancer’. Notably the group that did not get the sun, didn’t get cancer related to sun damage (like I get), but got more of the worse type cancers (not related to sun).
The assumption is the Vitamin D from the sun is helping the body to overcome the ‘other kinds of cancer’.

Interesting food for thought
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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby jjsledge » Sun Jan 08, 2017 2:52 pm

Here is an article, if you're interested. http://www.realfarmacy.com/scientists-b ... reen-myth/

Jerry
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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby MoNatureMan » Sun Jan 08, 2017 3:41 pm

Good read.
Amazing how false sience and advertising for sunscreen ($$$$$$), can control the way society thinks about the sun.

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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby naturaldon » Mon Jan 09, 2017 2:38 pm

It is amazing though that those people of whom I know who have squamous skin cancers do seem to spend a lot of time outdoors. The few folk I know who had melanoma cancer refrained from a lot of sun exposure for precautionary reasons (fair skin, genetics, etc.). I hadn't thought much about this until I read this strip and gave it some thought. Hmmm. One friend with the squamous cell cancer also gets it primarily on his head.

I also note that most people I know who are dark skinned seem to get less cancers (I'm dark skinned and so far seem clear, and I don't use anything for sun screening). I could be wrong on that observation, or I just don't know enough people.
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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby Ramblinman » Mon Jan 09, 2017 6:46 pm

One of the best sun remedies is NOT sunscreen, but a diet rich in leafy greens and antioxidants.
Sunlight is essential for making D3 hormone, but even reasonable sun exposure takes its toll on skin.
That doesn't mean avoiding all sun. It simply means to adjust your diet to what God intended for better skin repair after those essential times in the sun.
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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby Maverick » Mon Jan 09, 2017 7:48 pm

I'm not dark-skinned but my arms, hands, and calves are acclimated to the sun and don't get burned. Other parts, like my nose, ears, and neck, are less acclimated and get burned during prolonged exposure. Unfortunately my whole body has only seen the light of day for maybe 30 minutes of my 21-year existence, but I hope to change that very, very soon.

The article Jerry posted said:
The link between melanoma and sun exposure (dermatology’s dogma) is unproven.There’s no conclusive evidence that sunburns lead to cancer.There is no real proof that sunscreens protect against melanoma.There’s no proof that increased exposure to the sun increases the risk of melanoma.


To which I say, Great and praise God! Because I've been sunburned at least once every summer for as long as I can remember, usually on my neck and shoulders.

My dad also had a benign growth removed from his head earlier this year. I believe it was basal but I'm not sure. He's bald but usually wears a hat in the sun for what that's worth.

Any good advice on acclimating one's skin to sunlight, perhaps by naturally increasing melanin production/darkening skin tone?
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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby JimShedd112 » Mon Jan 09, 2017 9:16 pm

Maverick, I found by gradually increasing my exposure to the sun, starting with perhaps 10 minutes per day for the first week or so, and gradually increasing the time as well as time of day from early to late in the day I'm able to avoid sunburn here in the Mojave Desert. In the past, I started my sun exposure as early as mid-January when temps were temperate enough.

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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby MoNatureMan » Mon Jan 09, 2017 11:41 pm

Mavrick
For clarification, benign is non-cancerous. Where ‘Squamous Cell’ and ‘Basal Cell' are both cancer, however they are localized and are not deadly unless ignored for years.

Agree with Jim. I also am out in Jan or Feb getting a few Winter rays (weather permitting). Suppose to be in 60 next couple days. If wind dies down a bit might be a good time.

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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby Maverick » Tue Jan 10, 2017 7:27 pm

MoNatureMan wrote:For clarification, benign is non-cancerous. Where ‘Squamous Cell’ and ‘Basal Cell' are both cancer, however they are localized and are not deadly unless ignored for years.


Thanks Ron for clearing that up, and thank you too Jim for the tips on adjusting to sunlight.

School starts for me next week, which means I have Tuesday and Thursday mornings to myself at home so I'm planning on spending nude time outdoors (i.e. in the backyard) as much as possible.
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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby naturaldon » Tue Jan 10, 2017 7:30 pm

Hey Ron, I'm also at it here, trying to get some sun all over, especially trying to keep my feet conditioned for outdoor walking.

Mav, enjoy the sun!
-Don
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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby Ramblinman » Wed Jan 11, 2017 6:11 pm

There is probably no need to spend every single day in the sun to build up a base tan.
3 times a week should give you the results you need.
On the other hand, you risk a burn if you try to get all your sun in one day.

Sunning for vitamin D won't work in the winter months for most of North America.
But when the angle of the sun finally gets high enough, you could make all the vitamin D you need long before the amount of sun required for tanning.

So many variables to consider:
Skin tone (darker skin is more protective against burns, but dark skin requires longer exposure to make the same vitamin D as a fair-skinned person)
How much moisture is in the atmosphere (to diminish UV)
Latitude (sun is stronger as you go closer to the equator).
Altitude (thinner air makes it easier to get UV rays)
Angle of the sun above the horizon (a function of time of day as well as latitude).
How naked can you get? If you can expose 100% of your skin to the sun for 10 minutes, obviously you can make more vitamin D than you can with 10% covered by fabric.
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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby Maverick » Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:30 pm

Ramblinman wrote:So many variables to consider:
Skin tone (darker skin is more protective against burns, but dark skin requires longer exposure to make the same vitamin D as a fair-skinned person)
How much moisture is in the atmosphere (to diminish UV)
Latitude (sun is stronger as you go closer to the equator).
Altitude (thinner air makes it easier to get UV rays)
Angle of the sun above the horizon (a function of time of day as well as latitude).
How naked can you get? If you can expose 100% of your skin to the sun for 10 minutes, obviously you can make more vitamin D than you can with 10% covered by fabric.


Well, having a (somewhat) engineering mind, I like variables. My hat is off to you too, Ramblinman.
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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby Petros » Fri Jan 13, 2017 9:46 am

So what is the formula in the handbook?
The truth, the stark naked truth, the truth without so much as a loincloth on, should surely be the investigator's sole aim - Basil Chamberlain
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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby Ramblinman » Fri Jan 13, 2017 10:26 am

Brother Petros,

My response will come in steps.

First a couple of paragraphs from an Australian article...
How Much Sun Is Enough?
A review of Vitamin D production from sunlight recommended getting all over sun (such as swimming in a pair of bathers) for about 10-15 minutes on a standard UV index of 7 day.* If the UV index is 14, you need half the time for the same amount of vitamin D. The UV index anywhere in Australia can be checked at http://www.bom.gov.au, the Bureau of Meterology website, and there are similar sites in all countries.** This is the dose of UV light just short of getting some colour in the skin on each occasion. 2-3 times a week is probably enough. This amount of whole body sun exposure generates the maximum amount of Vitamin D possible, that is about 10 000 to 15 000 international units (IU). Staying longer in the sun doesn’t cause any more Vitamin D to be made, and is a bad idea in that it raises the risk of other diseases, particularly skin cancer. Exposing a smaller area of the body for a longer period doesn’t work either as once all the vitamin D is made in a given area of skin (in the 15 minutes or so), no more is made until the chemical in the skin is formed again, roughly by the next day. This amount of sun exposure is very safe. ***

UVB produces Vitamin D when it hits the skin. All UV light gets through water, so swimming doesn’t reduce the amount of Vitamin D produced. However, ordinary glass absorbs UVB while letting the UVA through, so you can’t get Vitamin D by sitting inside and getting the sun through a glass window. Most solariums have a mixture of UVA and UVB but it is advisable to check with the solarium that this is the case before using or buying a sun-bed to get adequate Vitamin D on cloudy days.

*Vieth R. Vitamin D supplementation, 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, and safety. Am J Clin Nutr 1999; 69:842-856

** https://www.epa.gov/sunsafety/uv-index-1 UV Index for USA

*** Interesting! Since any given area of skin can only manufacture vitamin D for about 15 minutes of exposure (for fair-skinned individuals, a few minutes longer for darker skin), the only way to maximize vitamin D production is by total nudity in the sun.
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Re: Skin Cancer - Sun - Cancer

Postby Ramblinman » Fri Jan 13, 2017 10:34 am

Your Skin Phototype
- very good color illustration and web page link at bottom provides description of each major skin type. You may fall anywhere in this spectrum.
I am type III skin, but on the light side of it, so I am a little conservative with recommendations of sun for that type.

http://skincancer.dermis.net/content/e0 ... x_eng.html
Last edited by Ramblinman on Fri Jan 13, 2017 11:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
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