Breakfast Hash

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Breakfast Hash

Postby Bare_Truth » Fri Oct 21, 2016 10:35 am

I like a cooked breakfast and in our retirement my wife wished to forego that task so I adopted it as my own. I have a repertoire of breakfast entrées posted on the refrigerator and in the fog of drowsiness upon arising I peruse the list to see what inspires me and select one impromptu. One of my own invention is vegetable hash with beef (or without for vegetarians/vegans). Any good magazine presents the recipe with pictures to illustrate the preparation and show off the finished product. So I will embellish my presentation of this recipe, with step by step photographs.
01-Breakfast.jpg
1-4 Left click image for larger better detail
Frame 1 shows me in my usual "Breakfast Chef Attire". And on the menu for this morning is Vegetable Beef Hash, (leave out the beef and it would be Vegan/Vegetarian).
Frame 2 shows the vegetable ingredients (the little unlabeled yellow things are just the neck section of the summer squash) Pretty much any vegetables will do, and I follow the rule of thumb that variety of color tends toward balance of nutrition. In this frame The veggies have all been sliced into "coins" which are placed in stacks, in so far as practical, (or strips like the bell peppers). However the Garlic has already been chopped a good bit with the paring knife. Proportions of vegetables, one to another, are not critical and may be adjusted to availability and personal preference.
Frame 3 shows the veggies having been sliced right to left into slivers with the chef's knife
Frame 4 shows the veggies after cross slicing so that the veggies are down to about 1/4 inch cubes, though a little extra attention has been bestowed upon the garlic to make sure it is well minced.
02-Breakfast.jpg
5-8 Left click image for larger better detail
Frame 5 shows the veggies right after dumping/scraping the cutting sheet into a hot skillet that has been oiled and lightly salted and a little more salt is sprinkled over the top. The rising steam is evidence of the heat of the skillet, but the chef should be prepared to deal with an initial spatter as the juicy vegetables hit the hot oil and are seared. The veggies should be immediately stirred so as to not burn the ones on the bottom. If the burner was on high to get the skillet up to heat now is the time to turn it down to a moderate temperature for sautéing the veggies as they are stirred. I prefer the natural unseasoned taste that results from the mixture and seasoned only at serving, but if you like spices, now would be the time to add them. (Note: Should by happenstance a few of the veggies get burned do not scrape them loose from the bottom of the skillet and they will not seriously alter the taste. Just stir the loose stuff.)
Frame 6 depicts a critical step in cooking. The skillet should be promptly covered as this assures a more even heating of the contents so that cooking is more uniform and the stuff on the bottom is not over cooked and the stuff on the top undercooked.
Frame 7 is the Un-vegetarian step and may be skipped to suit personal preference. In this step some pre-cooked (usually left over roast or a bit of steak) is diced into 1/4 inch cubes and added to the skillet and stirred in. If raw meat is used, it would be best to first sauté it lightly in a separate pan or in the same pan before the vegetables are added.
Frame 8 shows a critical step for the sake of palatability! As vegetables have a very high water content, in order to make a good hash, it is necessary to "de-water" the hash a bit. Once the veggies are almost adequately cooked, simply leave the lid off and lightly stir the contents while the excess water evaporates. You will know that the contents are cooked when the potatoes and onion bits take on a pearly translucence and the hash clings a bit and is not wet looking.
03-Breakfast.jpg
Breakfast! Left click image for larger better detail
Serving: The hash is best placed on a preheated plate, preferably with a rim, Here it is seen with fresh French Pressed coffee, sugar, half&half and of course the necessary ingredient for any American Style Hash, the ubiquitous Ketchup! (Of course one might argue that this is actually "French Cuisine" given that the brand of Ketchup is "French's" :D :lol: :D )

As to how much does all that serve......, I eat about 80% of what was in the skillet and leave the rest for my wife, who though she will not eat breakfast, will come back later and nibble on the rest until it is gone, sometime in the mid morning. :D She is just not a "breakfast person", but then that just goes to show how kind she is to have fixed me breakfast all those mornings before sending me off to my office on Campus for another day of teaching engineering! :inlove:
I never met anyone that I could not learn something from.
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Bare_Truth
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Re: Breakfast Hash

Postby Petros » Fri Oct 21, 2016 2:38 pm

If that be a chef's outfit, aintcha spoze to have a white hat??
The truth, the stark naked truth, the truth without so much as a loincloth on, should surely be the investigator's sole aim - Basil Chamberlain
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Re: Breakfast Hash

Postby Bare_Truth » Fri Oct 21, 2016 10:20 pm

Petros wrote:If that be a chef's outfit, aintcha spoze to have a white hat??

Wearing a white hat seems to be a myth associated with being a good guy in old westerns like the guy who shot silver bullets and wore a mask! :lol:

Of course a key purpose of having a tall hat on a chef was the chimney effect that helped a chef stay cool (at least not the floppy ones.) or so I was told by a chef that wore such gear. Of course keeping hair out of the food and having enough cloth to mop ones brow may also apply. . Some modern chef's hats actually use mesh sections and or open tops to enhance the chimney effect Obviously I have another way to stay cool! :mrgreen:
I never met anyone that I could not learn something from.
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Bare_Truth
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