What have you done "naturally" lately?

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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby webmeister » Wed May 23, 2018 9:09 am

I know a guy that one day worked with glyphosate (Round Up) and had problems with the sprayer. By end of his work he had quite a dose on his hands. Next day we rushed him to ER as his body proceeded to evacuate the chemical from each orifice...It is not good for the body if PPE precautions are not taken. :(
I too know the horrors of Poison Oak. I liken the results to leprosy...thank God not permanent...

Be safe...
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Ramblinman » Wed May 23, 2018 9:28 am

webmeister wrote:I know a guy that one day worked with glyphosate (Round Up) and had problems with the sprayer. By end of his work he had quite a dose on his hands. Next day we rushed him to ER as his body proceeded to evacuate the chemical from each orifice...It is not good for the body if PPE precautions are not taken. :(
I too know the horrors of Poison Oak. I liken the results to leprosy...thank God not permanent...

Be safe...

God may have given Adam immunity against it. Humans in their present form, generally cannot touch it without those leprosy-like reactions.
So, as I preserve the natural quality of the wooded portion of my back yard, poison ivy cannot be part of the human natural area.
I will keep it at bay every time it tries to re-invade.
As I said before, since I am part of God's created natural world:
I can and will modify my natural area for human presence, while trying to accommodate the other creatures, plants and microbes that sustain the web of life.

Thorny plants sometimes feed me, but they MUST be set back from footpaths; same with pine cones.
Poison ivy berries feed birds, but CANNOT be allowed where I am likely to walk or work. Since it spreads,
I may take even further steps to remove it from my yard. It is in NO DANGER of going extinct.
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Bare_Truth » Wed May 23, 2018 10:49 pm

Ramblinman wrote:I have used Roundup with great success, but I won't use it anymore.
The stuff is simply too risky for human health.
Roundup is more than glyphosate. The other compounds in it magnify the danger to health.

Could you elaborate on that a bit. I am careful to avoid contact with it and I do not spray it as a mist that might be inhaled but only dispense it as a stream and I do not use leaky equipment that might drool it on my hands nor do I use it on food crops nor on soil that will be used for food crops. I also do not spray it when wind will blow it back on me.

So what are these alleged ingredients beside glyphosate. Also there are other brands with the only active ingredient being glyphosate.

Ramblinman wrote:Instead, try concentrated vinegar with a bit of detergent as a surfactant (keeping it away from streams).
Soap and vinegar are deadly at the point of application, but dilute and break down with no lingering consequences to the user if you avoid contact with skin.
As for this home made substitute, of key importance would be its ability to systemically poison the plant all the way to its roots. That is a key feature of Glyphosate

the active ingredients of the roundup concentrate are Glyphosate 18% And Diquat Dibromide0.73% The latter ingredient is discussed at:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diquat and is identified as becoming biologically inactive when bonded to clay in the soil. As the concentrate is then diluted at a volumetric ratio of 6 to 128 or .045 the amounts of ingredient in the spray is quite low. However that is sufficient that spotting on the poison leaves was seen within 24 hours. I went out this morning and observed the effects in order to see if there were any areas I had missed in the initial spraying but there were only a few hard to reach locations that were not showing the effects of yesterdays spraying. I touched up those areas to hasten the demise of this poison ivy patch.

I have heard of such mixtures as the vinegar and soap, and as they use such common GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) ingredients that they might be preferable if they in fact show systemic destruction of the plants. As I practice point application of any pesticides (as opposed to blanket application, My percentage application is quite tiny (not to mention economic, a 32 ounce bottle of concentrate will last me for years) My main concern is to treat areas that I frequent which could be predominately described as 15 feet to the right and left of all my trails and only if toxic or noxious weeds are seen. The only two plants I really attack are poison ivy, and a noxious thorny plant known as "Wild Rose" (or more to the point "Nature's Barbed Wire"). I have had no real success on the Wild Rose, except in the spring when it is leafing out in the spring. To my advantage is that the wild rose puts forth its tender leaflettes before any of the trees or shrubs, so collateral damage is virtually nill, althouth I am constrained to a very narrow time window in the spring when it is vulnerable. For the wild rose I use 2-4-D (Round Up Barely even fazes the stuff) Even then I have to later come back and cut out the thorny-woody-dead branches if they are in the way, and they can last for years.

If my discourse on this matter makes it sound like I am an advocate of extensive use or some kind of HERBICIDAL MANIAC, That is not so, My background of information comes from studying the safest effective way of controling some thoroughly noxious plant growth, and I would by far rather resort to cutting or mowing if that were at all practical but it seems not to generally be so. However the acquisition of a 5 foot wide mower for my tractor has already shifted the balance as there is a lot of growth that is readily kept in check by that machine. :D One of my motivations for obtaining that implement was a need to control the numerous bamboo groves I have planted as they can get a bit overzealous or maybe greedy for additional territory. But those plants have shown their merit in making wind breaks and privacy screens, and green all year forage, slope stabilization and graceful decoration and their amenability to mechanized management so that I can forgive and tolerate their one over zealous inclination. by careful siting and some once a year maintainance.
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby naturist » Thu May 24, 2018 1:47 am

I have tried multiple recipes of vineger and detergent as a weed killer. Sprayed it on hot days, even multiple times. It looks like it kills it but then I see new growth coming back up out of it. Has any of you truly had success with it?
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby jjsledge » Thu May 24, 2018 6:33 am

Those who judge the motives of othere are simply revealing what's in their own hearts. Frank Viola "Revise Us Again" p.89
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Jim » Thu May 24, 2018 6:49 am

I've had some success with multiflora rose with digging and pulling when the ground is wet. Not a job to do "naturally"! Sometimes a repeat is needed as you miss some roots, but works pretty well.
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Bare_Truth » Fri May 25, 2018 7:17 am

Jim wrote:I've had some success with multiflora rose with digging and pulling when the ground is wet. Not a job to do "naturally"! Sometimes a repeat is needed as you miss some roots, but works pretty well.
I have no experience with Multiflora rose but along the approximate 1 ro 2 miles of trails (Mostly through the woods) on my 20 acre property , manual methods of removal of wild rose plants simply is not practicle nor effective. The wild rose plants are extensively intertwined with the trees and the roots of this plant are intermingled with the tree roots. The fact that the wild rose plants leaf out with their tender leaves a week or two before any other deciduous perrennial plants however does give me a small window of time when 2-4-D can be applied "spot applied" with no discernable collateral damage. Glyphosate herbicide appears to essentially inneffective on this noxious plant.
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Bare_Truth » Fri May 25, 2018 12:46 pm

LOVE IT OR HATE IT, TRUST IT OR SKEPTICAL, ROUNDUP (Glyphosate with a bit of Diquat Dibromide) is effective at killing poison ivy.
Single_Plant_Kill.jpg
Left Click for Higher Resolution

From the previous comments above on the use of herbicides. I have mixed feelings about the use of herbicides, and poisonous or injurious plants are pretty much my limit for when I will use them and I restrict my use to targeted spot applications to non-food plants in areas where I do not grow food crops. But as the image shows, the glyphosate stuff works quickly on poison ivy, and as it is a systemic herbicide it will kill the entire plant all the way back to its roots. Since Poison ivy spreads itself into entire areas by its root system, this is particularly important to reducing the amount that must be applied as what often looks like multiple plants is actually just a few that have popped up in multiple sprouts each.

Ivy_Patch_Kill.jpg
Left Click for Higher Resolution

This image shows a patch of the poison ivy that was the result of about a single years growth and spread. The herbicide kill is more evident in the foreground probably due to a heavier application or a higher sun exposure at that edge of the patch. The higher sun exposure encourages more rapid plant growth in the ivy. However the spotting on the leaves resulting from the herbicide extends all the way back to the tree trunks just beyond the upper edge of the image.

The rapid spread of the patch is likely due to spreading of the roots rather than multiple seeds as the seeds are commonly spread by the birds that eat them and for such a sudden development of that large of a patch would likely require a flock of birds gorging on seeds and then having a poop-fest. The location is however an ideal environment for poison ivy growth as it is right at the edge of woodland where it adjoins an open field. Poison ivy is a plant that thrives in such transition zones. Shortly into the woodland the incidentce of the poison ivy is less prominent and only in small outbreaks. This sort of distribution of poison ivy is a more common mode unless conditions for it are more ideal for some other reason.
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby naturaldon » Fri May 25, 2018 9:45 pm

Fished. See pics.
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby jjsledge » Sat May 26, 2018 7:39 am

Those who judge the motives of othere are simply revealing what's in their own hearts. Frank Viola "Revise Us Again" p.89
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby JimShedd112 » Mon May 28, 2018 12:22 am

Worked on my all-over tan for about an hour. The rat of the day I spent in shorts only.

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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby webmeister » Mon May 28, 2018 9:53 am

Hey Jim not sure what the rat of the day is? :lol: I spent the whole day naked, the weather is so great! Enjoyed gardening/setting up more drip system and worked on projects. More of the same today :D
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby JimShedd112 » Mon May 28, 2018 11:52 am

Sorry about thatceebmeoster, “ray of the day” should have been “rest of the day.” You shoulda seen what my finger (yep, one finger) typed before I caught myself this time around. Anyway, I’m happy for all of you who can go nude pretty much ‘round the clock and wish I could do the same.

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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Bare_Truth » Tue May 29, 2018 11:13 pm

Well it certainly has been hot a lot lately here in Missouri, and it has been humid too, and we have had plenty of rain. Put that all together and what you get is a lawn about 18 inches deep and going to seed and a need to mow the lawn twice a week. Of course if you have read some of the above posts, I have a new super weapon (that I am still learning to use) against excessive vegetative growth in the form of a 5 foot wide rotary mower on the back of my 22 hp diesel tractor. I have now achieved enough finesse at using it that I can do the entire acre of lawn around the house without tearing up the lawn (well maybe a few spots that get a little scuffed still exist. And of course the soil moisture is a problem because my tractor has agricultural (herring bone cleated) tires instead of turf tires. so If I am not careful and accurate in judging the soil conditions I could leave tire tracks in the lawn. So mowing and mowing practice with the new equipment has been one of afew dominant themes. Given that my roadside bamboo groves give me good privacy I have been able to do most all (not quite all) of the mowing while nude :D :D :D !

The following image is relevant to my nude use of my property but reflects some work that had to be done in textile mode (or at least that mode was highly advisable).

Well for whatever it means I got a message that said
"Sorry, the board attachment quota has been reached." But as I noted I was able to put it into my photo gallery. I hope I will still be able to continue to post in mixed mode of text and images as each mode enhances the other to communicate the intended message.

I was not aware that there was such a quota, and i do not know if it is referring to something that is personal to me, or whether there is no possibility for further image posting for everyone. I did however manage to put it into my personal gallery and it appears to have been accepted there, (or at least I can view it. What it shows is where the bamboo had nearly reached the edge of the gravel road and I was able to take 5 feet of width off of the grove by driving down the edge of the grove with the tractor mounted mower. This could have been accomplished with a pair of loppers but it would have been hours of manual labor instead of minutes of machine operation. I deemed that the picture was relevant in this venue given as I have posted much about the virtues of bamboo for privacy hedges, wind breaks, and dust filters (for gravel roads) But alas I was not able to do this mowing nude due to passing traffic. I would have felt terrible if someone had lost control of their car while gawlking at the tractor operator (not to mention that some of my neighbors would have taken umbrage.

If anyone has an explanation as to what that error message meant, I would appreciate knowing.
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Re: What have you done "naturally" lately?

Postby Bare_Truth » Sun Jun 10, 2018 11:25 pm

Well the last couple of days I was catching up on the garden work. It being hot and sunny and my summer tan well underway I proceeded to do these tasks nude. So I:
-- weeded the sweet potatoes then
-- I hoed out the weeds in the regular potatoes,
-- and since those are both crops for I have previously described my Trench planting system I flooded the trenches to irrigate them 95 trenches @ 100 gallons per trench = 500 gallons That should take care of deep watering that will last for quite a few days).
-- I also watered all the individual plants in the 900 sq ft garden individually with a bucket. (That way I am watering the plants and not the weeds too :D )

I also mowed the lawn. but as the "yard tractor/mower"is broken. I used the small farm tractor with the 5 foot rotary mower. The dryness of the ground prevents the ag tires from tearing up the lawn or the open trails in the field and the brand of mower i have, while not a finish mower, I have developed my technique so that I get a reasonable approximation of a lawn quality mowing job. And at least that mower is so tough I cannot break it on the rocks that keep pushing up out of the soil and I have also been doing some work on the "woodland" which I describe in another post where I am clearing out the rough areas as well as mowing the grass in hopes of being able to host visitors in a camping area. I am still getting used to how to best exploit that tractor mower and I think I see some ideas that might upgrade the quality of cut I get on lawn grasses.

Additional landscape work that I have been doing nude includes the planting and tending of weeping willow trees that I have planted. These trees will be of moderate size (30' tall and wide), and I have strategecially placed them to screen areas that can be seen into by passing cars and pedestrians who might look through the driveway gap in the bamboo screening grove . This adds some variety to the landscaping and provides trees which serve better in those locations where the bamboo is not the best choice. These willows can also be planted in some low spots that can get soggy in wet weather and the willows being "soggy tolerant - heavy water feeders" should help with soil conditions there (no I am not putting them near a septic drain field :shock: :duh: ). I have planted 4 near the house and 4 in a low spot adjacent to the road that gets standing water during heavy rains. (they replaced the culvert there but did a poor job of it and it impounds some water and they sloped it improperly and the culvert accumulates soil and drains poorly). The willows should stabilize the soil that is washing into the culvert and dry out the low spot.

Other than those specific activities, I am spending most of my time nude, and as always I always breakfast nude on the deck with my wife (who alas does breakfast in textile mode)
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