Landscaping For Naturism.

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Re: Landscaping For Naturism.

Postby DaveT » Mon Jun 25, 2018 12:59 am

My agriculture knowlege has been in gardening and fertility, not landscaping. And I live where all i need do is go deeper into the woods to find security. But nevertheless i like the idea of greenhouses for creating eden in miniture. Growing tropical food in cold climates And providing security from sight, and a warm place in winter. Been working on technology to provide energy to run them, off grid, or free from excessive expense for heating. On the fertility side attempting to duplicate terra preta, using nutrient dense fertility, mineral balancing and biochar. Get the eden flavor and nutritional quality back.
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Re: Landscaping For Naturism.

Postby Bare_Truth » Mon Jun 25, 2018 8:32 am

DaveT wrote:My agriculture knowlege has been in gardening and fertility, not landscaping....... But nevertheless i like the idea of greenhouses for creating eden in miniture. .....t, and a warm place in winter. ...... free from excessive expense for heating. ......
So then do you have any information or insights with respect to a Trombe Wall? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trombe_wall
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Re: Landscaping For Naturism.

Postby webmeister » Mon Jun 25, 2018 8:56 am

I really like theses geodesic greenhouses https://geodesic-greenhouse-kits.com/greenhouse_pictures/ I could plop one in the backyard (would take up most of the yard and have year round clothing free gardening without a thought about any neighbors. I have a lot of time when I do not worry, but this would eliminate any worry. :)
Large enough they can have small water falls and raised beds...Could have veggies year round...
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Re: Landscaping For Naturism.

Postby DaveT » Tue Jul 10, 2018 4:36 pm

Looks like the Trombe Wall is a slight variation on the basic passive solar house, in a greenhouse it's been done with a back wall of steel barrels painted flat black filled with water to adsorb heat. Then it releases the heat all night. Works great where sunshine is predominant all winter. But in our climate in SE USA we get times in the winter when the sun don't shine for weeks at a time. Maybe one day or a few hours in a week or two, or a whole month. therefore solar is unreliable for us. And during those times backup artificial lighting is very helpful for some things to make up for constant clouds and short days.

I had a design book once for a 100% passive solar heated house that had a concrete grid in the basement heated with solar heat from collectors on the roof, circulated with fans, at night the air would be circulated from the basement heat sink through the house. Again it works great where the sunshine in winter is more consistent. The mid SE USA is a constant mixing zone of moisture coming up from gulf of Mexico meeting cool to cold air coming down from Canada, the two surface air streams keep colliding and mixing in this region causing a lot of clouds and rain off and on, sometimes turning to snow in winter when the north air wins the battle. And then in summer the humidity buildup spawns thunderstorms that just pop up spontaneously. Sometimes so prevalent for weeks at a time it can be hard to find 3 days to get hay dry. 55-60 inches of rain per year. Not quite qualifying as rain forest, but sometimes it seems like we go into rain forest weather for periods of time.
I have ideas gleaned from much research that are promising, for energy to heat, cool and light, that is not tied to unreliable solar or wind, and expense free once set up.

While I like the shape of the dome, aesthetically pleasing, might want to use it just to look nice. The practical aspect of material usage and ease of construction makes the rectangular type predominant. Twin wall polycarbonate is the most practical glazing, comes in 4 ft and 6ft wide panels any length desired. Of the other two options, 6 mill greenhouse poly is only 4 year rated and glass can break too easy, risk of shattering the whole roof in a hail storm.

I have plenty of cedar trees and a sawmill. I could put together a large locust and cedar frame with very little cost. The expense is going to be mostly in the floor with a heated slab. I have tried growing things in an air heated greenhouse, not very good results, the heat needs to come from underneath and let the air be cooler. I've heard plants do well with warm roots and cool air. So hot water pumped through pipes in a concrete floor is the plan.
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Re: Landscaping For Naturism.

Postby Ramblinman » Tue Jul 10, 2018 5:54 pm

Dave,

The mass of the earth itself is a good source of passive heat in winter.
I was in a cave in NW Georgia and the temperature is a constant 57 degrees F.
While an excavated hillside won't be quite as warm, if you dig in a bit on a south-facing slope, you might achieve your goal of minimal hours of active heating.
It makes your greenhouse a "pit greenhouse". Lot of info online, but here's one example: https://insteading.com/blog/underground-greenhouse/
Keeping water out is one of the major concerns, but in example #6, a grower in Tennessee takes advantage of the natural drainage of a hillside to ensure that water does not accumulate.

In any part of the USA, a geodesic dome is the most efficient way to trap heat.
In the SE USA, that is NOT always a good thing.

A semi-rectangular box-shaped or half cylinder with fan on one end to expel air and louvers on the other to draw it in (through bug screen) is what commercial growers use.
It is a compromise, providing fairly good heat dissipation on sunny days and can be modified for passive heat collection to some extent.
Shade cloth and either hand-cranking or motor-opening ridge vents would block and release heat as well.
Misting systems are another means. Evaporative cooling does work, even here in the SE USA, not as well as the western states, but every bit of cooling helps.
Misting systems do not create fungal problems because the design assumes that you also have fans to exchange and move air and the droplet size is too small to settle on foliage.

In the greenhouse kit sold by Growing Spaces of Pagosa Springs, Colorado, they offer a large water tank in each geodesic greenhouse that provides a massive heat sink, buffering both high and low temperatures. The size of the tank is a function of the size of the enclosed space. It does take up a lot of interior space that could otherwise be used for growing, but if your goal is to minimize active heating and active cooling energy costs, this is a prime way to achieve it. Besides, maybe you want to have some water plants and fish.

Another passive technique that will clearly help:
I've seen some twin wall greenhouses that fill the gap with insulating pellets at night and then it sucks them out by day to let in the sun.

Polycarbonate is great stuff, resists hailstones, but transmits nearly as much as glass.
My grandfather had hardware cloth on the windward side of his glass greenhouse and that seems to have protected him against most hailstones, but we have better options.

In the far north, winter light is so weak that only glass can transmit the light that is needed.
In England, say 50 degrees north, they have to provide supplemental lighting in winter. Natural sunlight is simply not enough, even though they used glass, which transmits light so effectively.
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Re: Landscaping For Naturism.

Postby Bare_Truth » Thu Jul 12, 2018 10:55 pm

I am getting more and more use out of that 5' rotary cutter I bought for my tractor as I continue with my project to clean up the "woodland" at the mid point of our property. It is turning into more of a park like property as what undergrowth and brush was there is turned into what looks like a lawn or forest floor (depending on how much sun is blocked by the canopy).

It is showing its suitability as a base for group recreation and continues to improve while it is surrounded by more completely wild forest surroundings. Cleaning it up has greatly increased its fire resistance to the point of being a bit of a fire break should the woods ever catch fire again, as the lack of a contiguous layer of combustable ground trash and brush would not support much combustion. The area is like an open forest without the understory growth. It gives a sense of openness without the barrenness or subsequent weediness of a cleared field. The walking is easy and the breeze flows through easily. Given the density of the canopy the return of the cleaned areas to coarse field weeds or brambles should be slow. And I can assure you that that well developed canopy is most welcome given the hot sunny weather we have been experiencing.
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